OpenType features can be available in one software and not others. Please refer to your software manual for more information about the support. Note also that OpenType features may be oddly translated in your own language. In many Typofonderie fonts, some features are duplicated in several OpenType features to offer the best user experience depending the own limits of applications you can use. To learn more, read this article about OpenType features on ilovetypography.com

MacOS by default propose OpenType feature support in Office 2011, TextEdit, Pages, Keynote, etc. So, some third parties applications who use Apple typography engine may support the OpenType features too.

Under Windows, Office 2010 support OpenType features.

Adobe Creative Suite offer a good OpenType features support. Quark Xpress too.

Illustrator / glyphs and special characters
Indesign / Special characters + Apply OpenType attributes.
OpenType features on Office 2010.

Ligatures

Designed to correct awkward combinations of letters, such fi, ffi, fb, etc.

Discretionary Ligatures

Generally features ct, st, Th, sp ligatures.

Small Caps (from lowercases)

To activate small caps from texts sets in lowercases. Design follow standard capitals but are in wider form in a size to match the lowercase.

Small Caps (from capitals)

To activate small caps from texts sets in capitals. Design follow standard capitals but are in wider form in a size to match the lowercase.

Case forms

Special punctuations and additional letters with a distinct design and spacing for use in all-capital text settings.

Caps figures

These figures (generally standard figures in Pro versions) are designed in same alignment compatible with the uppercase characters of the typeface, they are preferred when setting certain texts, such as an all-capital headline and generally don’t fit well in lowercase text settings. Capitals figures can be designed in proportional and tabular versions.

Oldstyle figures (OsF)

These figures (also called OsF figures) are designed with ascenders and descenders and have features and proportions compatible with the lowercase characters of the typeface. Oldstyle figures, also known as hanging figures, are typically used for text settings because they blend in well with the optical flow and rhythm of the lowercase alphabet. Oldstyle figures can be designed in proportional and tabular versions.

Semi Oldstyle figures

These figures are designed with ascenders and descenders and have features and proportions compatible with the lowercase characters of the typeface. Semi Oldstyle figures are a sort of intermediate version between Oldstyles figures and caps figures, in some cases, they are the standard version in OpenType fonts such in Costa or Ardoise.

Tabular Figures

Tabular Figures are especially useful when setting columns of numbers, such as in financial reports. Tabular figures can be Caps, OldStyle or Semi Oldstyle in their design.

Non-tabular Figures

Non-tabular Figures are very good for any text or headlines, to avoid the unnecessary space between 1. For financials reports, switch to Tabular figures. Non-tabular figures can be Caps, OldStyle or Semi Oldstyle in their design.

Fractions

Fractions include an expanded set of the most commonly used diagonal fractions beyond 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 and may include any additional fractions. Just key any figures, including zero and slash or fraction bar, then apply the feature.

Numerators, Denominators

Figures used to set fractions and in some cases: footnote references, chemical compounds, mathematical exponents.

Ordinals/Superior Letters and figures

Theses features call superior letterforms and figures that are used when creating ordinals, which specify position in a numbered series, and in certain English, French and Spanish abbreviations, such as Madame, compagnie, and segundo. Theses various kind of figures are used for footnote references, chemical compounds, and as mathematical exponents.

Contextual ligatures

Contextual ligatures help to give words a slightly more animated and informal appearance and to lend more visual interest to type composition.

Stylistic sets or Stylistic Alternates

Stylistic sets or Stylistic Alternates were designed to offer various effects to words: any kind of alternates to give words a slightly more animated and informal appearance and to lend more visual interest to type composition. Ligatures can also added to such features depending of the situation. Their names in software menues are still basic, Stylistic set 1, Stylistic 2, but this situation will change in the future. References to the Stylistic set are generally clearly explanded into the pdf specimen available on the typeface page. Stylistic Alternates was a pre-Stylistic sets feature that you can find in applications like Adobe Illustrator, who doesn’t offer same level of support.

Swashes

Swashes forms appeared during the sixteenth century, notably in typefaces from Garamond, Granjon, etc. Generally, swashes are ornamented italic capitals, today it extends to any letterforms with an ornamental effect.

Titling alternates

A bit similar to swashes, in a sense this feature propose variation of a glyph for display setting.

Intials and finals

Works a bit like swashes or contextual ligatures, but works precisely with begin or end of words.

Historicals sorts

Propose long s to be used contextually depending the position in the words.

Ornaments

Common ornaments include fleurons, vignettes, borders, bullets, brackets, arrows, and any contemporary graphic decorations. In several cases, we added a copy of this feature into the Stylistic set for a better support of ornaments in softwares who don’t support yet the Ornaments feature.